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School Libraries in the News


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#1 Beckie Mac

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Posted 16 May 2011 - 08:52 AM

Follow thread of most recent news below in replies.

If you have more to add please do so or you can engage in the discussion here.

**NEW** Sept. 2011 (Video)

http://www.cbc.ca/video/#/News/Local_News/Windsor/1317913355/ID=2137394359 Here is a link to the news story about school libraries that ran on theWindsor CBC 6 p.m. news last night. Move the slider to just after the 19 minute mark.


Newspaper articles:

http://www.theglobea...article2023169/

http://www.latimes.c...002882.column

http://www.ottawacit...5544/story.html

Students walk out to protest library cuts http://www.cbc.ca/ne..._medium=twitter

Libraries not being cut in Waterloo Region schools
http://www.therecord...-region-schools

School libraries vital for students
http://www.therecord...al-for-students

Ontario school library staffing down: report Staffing in eastern, northern Ontario below average
http://www.cbc.ca/ne...braries549.html

Education minister urges school boards to reconsider library closing
http://www.globalnew...1181/story.html

How to make school libraries relevant again
http://www.theglobea...article2024082/

School-library cuts a miscommunication problem, education group says
http://www.montrealg...2949/story.html

http://www.windsorst...4071/story.html

http://www.theglobea...article2030514/

http://ca.topmodel.y...st-century.html

Online Sources:

http://www.parentcen...k-for-cutbacks

People for Education's May 2011 report on "School Libraries & Information Technology" http://bit.ly/juFO6j & See the convo happening at People for Education: http://schools-at-th...-libraries-help

People for Education: School Library Report: The state of school libraries in Ontario http://www.peoplefor...hoollibrary2011

Windsor Student starts a petition to re-instate library staff: http://www.thepetiti...hool-Libraries/

http://www.etfo.ca/M...mation Age.aspx

Blogs:

http://sethgodin.typepad.com

http://doug-johnson.squarespace.com

http://timgauntley.blogspot.com/

Doug Peterson: It Better Be About The Technology http://dougpete.word...the-technology/

http://tedbarris.com...lves/#more-1048

Do schools still need school libraries? Check out their comments - blogs.hpedsb.on.ca/peci/morsette

Edublog for my students to voice their opinions about having a school library. I should be receiving more responses next week after introducing it to all of my junior grade students. [url="mpbib3.edublogs.org "[url="http://mpbib3.edublogs.org/"]]mpbib3.edublogs.org[/url][/url]

http://library.utm.u...blog/main/70710


Audio/Video Sources:

See Forest of Reading on CBC News http://bit.ly/l45hrs

Global News: http://bit.ly/ksuCKU

http://jo-online.vsb.bc.ca/bondi/

Jian Ghomeshi's opening essay: "Who will speak for the endangered school librarian? Technological change does not replace human guidance" - if you miss it live you can visit http://www.cbc.ca/q/ to listen to the podcast once posted. link to listen: http://tinyurl.com/3fvf36t

CBC Metro Morning's interview with president of Ontario School Library Association:
http://www.cbc.ca/me...ool-librarians/

http://www.chextv.co..._Libraries.aspx

Ontario Today listeners tell the story in their school libraries
http://www.cbc.ca/on...school-library/


If you have not registered for the OLA Community yet, please do so to enable your opportunity to post. If you have any questions about the OLA Community, please contact me. bmacdonald@accessola.com or 416-363-3388 X26

Please remember to log in and leave your links, comments or start a discussion on topic - I am posting links as I find them but I am sure there are many more out there you would like to share! Thanks! Beckie


#2 Beckie Mac

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 12:00 PM

RC schools resurrect their libraries

Board, Windsor public library team up to redesign

BY ANNE JARVIS, THE WINDSOR STARNOVEMBER 11, 2011

Seven months after effectively closing school libraries — igniting a furor and drawing national headlines — the Windsor-Essex County Catholic school board has recruited the Windsor Public Library to help resurrect its libraries.
Photograph by: File photo, The Windsor Star
WINDSOR, Ont. -- Seven months after effectively closing school libraries — igniting a furor and drawing national headlines — the Catholic school board has recruited the Windsor Public Library to help resurrect its libraries.

“Certainly I said I get it,” board director Paul Picard said after meeting with library board chairman Al Maghnieh and CEO Barry Holmes on Thursday.

“They’re the pros at this,” he said of the library. “They have huge knowledge and expertise. We’re really, really excited about it. I can’t stress that enough. We think this has huge possibilities.”

“They certainly did indicate that they took a lot of heat and that they do need support in terms of getting back on track,” said Maghnieh, who toured St. Christopher elementary school and Holy Names high school with Holmes.

“Hallelujah!” said Dana Tonus, a member of the board’s parent involvement committee. “I think I have to sit down to absorb this. To me, that means they listened.”

The library will help the board redesign its libraries, modernizing them and making them more attractive, bring in more fiction, advise the board on digital equipment, supply librarians after school and offer new programs like self-publishing and designing apps.

Every student will get a library card and have access to the library’s entire collection, from ebooks to music and movies, via school computers. Students’ families may even be able to use the new libraries, Picard said.

“There are excellent opportunities to really bring these libraries back to life again,” said Maghnieh.

Don’t look at a library as a facility or an expense, he said he told the board. “It’s where you go to really use your imagination and make ideas come to fruition.”

The board voted at a closed meeting last April to lay off most of its librarians. Books were to be moved to classrooms, and library hours limited. It shut down its computerized cataloguing system.

Trustees cited projected declining enrolment and the resulting loss of $8 million to $10 million in government funds. The board said students do most of their reading online.

Most of the libraries have now been equipped with WiFi, and are getting iPads and Smartboards. But they’ll have books, too, said Picard. They will become the main libraries in schools, and classrooms will become like satellite branches.

“We would like to get some fresh fiction out there to get kids interested in reading,” said Holmes. “It’s about content, and that comes in a variety of forms. You can have just a digital library, but you would be severely lacking.”

The libraries will no longer be called “learning common areas” or “21st century learning centres,” Picard said.

“We will be naming them libraries,” he said.

“The first bit of advice we took is that they’re libraries. “You can’t help but feel and see the passion — we got it in spades. The term library doesn’t just talk about a collection of books. Library really does talk about a place where literacy is celebrated.”

Said Maghnieh, “We said it’s very important they call them libraries. Everything we do there is what belongs in libraries and what libraries stand for. There’s no other name for that.”

The semantics are “incredibly important” for parents, said Tonus.

“They want an environment that is focused on student literacy and opportunities for students to learn and broaden their horizons,” she said. “A library gives that impression.”

The board hopes to start with several schools in the new year, Picard said. He also wants to consult with the parent committee.

The library is not charging the board initially because it will use existing resources. It also sees the move as an investment in the future, said Maghneih and Holmes.

The library will get thousands of new members and dozens of new libraries without building new branches. It will be free advertising, said Holmes.

“What we want to focus on is keeping the library connected to kids. We think it’s a way of growing membership and maintaining it,” he said. “This is a win-win for the community and the education system.”

But the board will have to “commit significant dollars” to pay for renovating and equipping the libraries, Picard said. He doesn’t know how much it will cost, he said. But the board has already spent between $400,000 and $500,000 on WiFi and renovations. Some of the money will come from the capital budget and some from school fundraising.

Some school librarians were hired back last year for one year. Picard said he doesn’t know if the board will keep those employees. It will wait to see how the new libraries are used, he said. More supervision will be needed for students, but it isn’t clear what training will be needed, he said.

ajarvis@windsorstar.com

#3 Beckie Mac

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 12:00 PM

Catholic schools restoring libraries

Controversial decision revisited

BY ANNE JARVIS, THE WINDSOR STARNOVEMBER 12, 2011


Seven months after effectively closing school libraries - igniting a furor and drawing national headlines - the Catholic school board has recruited the Windsor Public Library to help resurrect its libraries.

"Certainly I said I get it," board director Paul Picard said after meeting with library board chairman Al Maghnieh and CEO Barry Holmes on Thursday. "They're the pros at this," he said of the library. "They have huge knowledge and expertise. We're really, really excited about it. I can't stress that enough. We think this has huge possibilities."

"They certainly did indicate that they took a lot of heat and that they do need support in terms of getting back on track," said Maghnieh, who toured St. Christopher elementary school and Holy Names high school with Holmes.

"Hallelujah!" said Dana Tonus, a member of the board's parent involvement committee. "I think I have to sit down to absorb this. To me, that means they listened."

The library will help the board redesign its libraries, modernizing them and making them more attractive, bring in more fiction, advise the board on digital equipment, supply librarians after school and offer new programs like self-publishing and designing apps. Every student will get a library card and have access to the library's entire collection, from ebooks to music and movies, via school computers. Students' families may even be able to use the new libraries, Picard said.

"There are excellent opportunities to really bring these libraries back to life again," said Maghnieh.

Don't look at a library as a facility or an expense, he said he told the board. "It's where you go to really use your imagination and make ideas come to fruition."

The board voted at a closed meeting last April to lay off most of its librarians. Books were to be moved to classrooms, and library hours limited. It shut down its computerized cataloguing system. Trustees cited projected declining enrolment and the resulting loss of $8-10 million in government funds. The board said students do most of their reading online.

Most of the libraries have now been equipped with WiFi, and are getting iPads and Smartboards. But they'll have books, too, said Picard. They will become the main libraries in schools, and classrooms will become like satellite branches.

"We would like to get some fresh fiction out there to get kids interested in reading," said Holmes. "It's about content, and that comes in a variety of forms. You can have just a digital library, but you would be severely lacking."

The libraries will no longer be called "learning common areas" or "21st century learning centres," Picard said.

"We will be naming them libraries," he said. "The first bit of advice we took is that they're libraries. You can't help but feel and see the passion - we got it in spades. The term library doesn't just talk about a collection of books. Library really does talk about a place where literacy is celebrated."

Said Maghnieh, "We said it's very important they call them libraries. Everything we do there is what belongs in libraries and what libraries stand for. There's no other name for that."

The semantics are "incredibly important" for parents, said Tonus.

"They want an environment that is focused on student literacy and opportunities for students to learn and broaden their horizons," she said. "A library gives that impression."

The board hopes to start with several schools in the new year, Picard said. He also wants to consult with the parent committee.

The library is not charging the board initially because it will use existing resources. It also sees the move as an investment in the future, said Maghneih and Holmes. The library will get thousands of new members and dozens of new libraries without building new branches. It will be free advertising, said Holmes.

"What we want to focus on is keeping the library connected to kids. We think it's a way of growing membership and maintaining it," he said. "This is a win-win for the community and the education system."

But the board will have to "commit significant dollars" to pay for renovating and equipping the libraries, Picard said. He doesn't know how much it will cost, he said. But the board has already spent between $400,000 and $500,000 on WiFi and renovations. Some of the money will come from the capital budget and some from school fundraising.

Some school librarians were hired back last year for one year. Picard said he doesn't know if the board will keep those employees.

ajarvis@windsorstar.com